Laser beam profiling

Laser beam profiling

What is laser beam profiling used for?

Major industries of the modern world, such as scientific, medical and industrial, are utilising lasers in a variety of applications.

Some application examples are spectroscopy, telecommunications, medical treatment procedures, laser guidance systems, as well as industrial operations like laser welding and cutting.

The performance of the laser beam is often critical to ensure correct operation of these applications.

As such, laser beam profiling or analysis is often employed to ensure that the laser beam exhibits the expected and required beam shape, distribution and beam width.

Infrared camera based laser beam analysis

The spatial intensity distribution of a laser beam is one of the key parameters to understand how a laser will perform in an application.

Since many applications require infrared laser wavelengths, infrared cameras have become a key part for these beam analysis systems.

Using a (infrared) camera based laser beam analyser, one can measure the full laser beam profile in two dimensions, in one single frame. Cameras can also work with both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) lasers.

 

(Mechanical scanning instruments and methods only work on CW lasers.)

 

What do we offer?

Xenics offers various types of SWIR camera in four wavelength ranges:

Xenics supplies various infrared cameras that are suitable for laser beam profiling applications. 

All these cameras come with control software and software to display a beam profile. Most Xenics cameras also come with a standard filter holder. 

See Related Products for a full list of our cameras that are compatible with this application. 

 

Note: Xenics does not supply complete laser beam profiling systems – we do not have software to implement quantitative calculations.

 

What features are needed?

  • Wavelength
    The infrared camera should have a high quantum efficiency at the laser wavelength of interest.
  • High frame rates and low image lag
    In some applications, it is necessary to monitor the laser beam continuously, in real time.
  • Windowless sensors
    A windowless sensor helps to reduce interference fringes in the resulting laser beam profile image.
  • Variable integration or exposure time
    A variable exposure time can make the camera suitable for a variety of laser powers, avoiding over-saturation.
  • Linearity
    A linear camera response is required in order to achieve accurate beam profile and beam width measurements.

Are you looking for more information? 

Let us know. We are happy to help.

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Documents

Whitepapers
Laser beam profiling and infrared cameras In this white paper, we will address the general need for laser beam profile analysis. Further, we will briefly describe laser beam analysis instruments and give an overview of laser applications, in particular for infrared wavelengths.

World's first InGaAs camera photon emission microscope

Xenics enabled Semicaps to realize the world's first InGaAs camera photon emission microscope in 2004. Since then Xenics and sInfraRed have supported us in our endeavors for better sensitivity and resolution in photon and thermal emission microscopy.

Chua Choon Meng, CEO Semicaps