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Suitable products for this application

 

Infrared Semiconductor Inspection

Infrared semiconductor inspection can be used to optimize manufacturing processes. Product yield, quality and failure analysis are becoming key in the semiconductor industry, both on wafer level, as well as on die or packaged device level.

 

Emission microscopy: Photon emission microscopy, or electroluminescence imaging, is a relatively new failure analysis technique for detecting photonic radiation from a defect site, primarily due to carrier recombination mechanisms. Essentially, the primary role of infrared semiconductor inspections identifies and localizes defects.

Solar Ingot Inspection

Silicon (Si) is a common material used for the production of semiconductor wafers, which are eventually processed into (opto-)electronic components for use in various electronics products. Wafers made from poor quality silicon can cause deficiencies in components or may cause them to fail entirely. Impurities, defects, voids, or inclusions in silicon bricks and ingots should be inspected before they are further processed into wafers.

 

SWIR InGaAs cameras are widely used in the semiconductor industry for the inspection of crystalline silicon (Si) bricks or ingots. Impurities and inclusions inside the brick or ingot can be easily detected using a SWIR camera and a light source emitting with a wavelength longer than 1150 nm. The reason for this is that the bandgap in this semiconductor material (Si) does not absorb the lower energy and longer wavelength SWIR photons, whereas visible photons (which have higher energy) are absorbed.

 

In short, this allows inspectors to see through the ingot, easily spotting any complications that may impact the quality of the final product. This makes SWIR InGaAs cameras an excellent, straightforward inspection tool for a smooth wafer production process

Food Sorting

Ensuring safety and consistency in the delivery of food products to consumers is a must. Food inspection and sorting systems not only ensure this, but can also boost efficiency and profit for companies who employ them in Food & Beverages (F&B) industries.

 

Numerous inspections can be carried out using infrared wavelengths and imagers. In food sorting systems, SWIR is used in the detection and removal of foreign contaminants, mainly for frozen fruits or vegetables. SWIR based sorting systems find contaminants by detecting differences in moisture content that may be difficult to spot in the visible spectrum.

 

When used hyperspectral imaging systems, one can determine the freshness of certain produce, or to spot defects such as cracks or bruises that may compromise the quality of the product. Other times they are used to determine the quality and grading of certain products, such as coffee beans from a plantation.

 

Lastly, within the sorting process, thermal imaging can also be used to obtain temperature readings in the preparation of food products, ensuring they are at the correct temperature during/before packaging or during transportation.

Recycling

Due to a finite amount of resources, recycling is not only profitable but crucial for the future sustainability of our planet. Plastic production, and thus waste generation, remains high in the modern world due to its flexibility and demand.

 

The recycling of plastics faces certain challenges, particularly in the process of identifying the various types of polymers. Sorting the various types of plastics is important as certain types release harmful compounds when recycled and should be handled differently during the recycling process.

 

Manually sifting through heaps of waste in search of plastics is not only unprofitable but time-consuming and error-prone. Automated vision systems look to address this, by accurately identifying and sorting plastics to provide a cheaper and more efficient means of recycling. Such systems achieve success through Infrared Spectroscopy or Hyperspectral Imaging.
Both techniques involve imaging in the short-wave or near infrared band. At these wavelength bands, the infrared spectrum of each type of polymer is unique (due to its chemical composition), allowing the vision system to easily distinguish and separate the plastics.